Ugh! This little fellow crops up again and again in my posts.  What is he?
You can begin to learn more Here

Ugh! This little fellow crops up again and again in my posts.  What is he?

You can begin to learn more Here

A page from the fabulous Dictionary of Colours for Interior Decoration
You can find everything from the correct colour for London post boxes and battleships to that of the sash of the Order of the Garter.
This page shows colour samples in matt and gloss paint and also in pile fabric of (amongst others) Chinese Lacquer and the soil of Kenya.

A page from the fabulous Dictionary of Colours for Interior Decoration

You can find everything from the correct colour for London post boxes and battleships to that of the sash of the Order of the Garter.

This page shows colour samples in matt and gloss paint and also in pile fabric of (amongst others) Chinese Lacquer and the soil of Kenya.

LIVING-ROOM IN A GEORGIAN HOUSE IN NORFOLK
Ceiling, walls and paintwork are white.  The wall over the fireplace covered with Japanese grass-paper.  White tiled surround fireplace with grey and white tiled hearth.  Black slate mantel shelf, polished copper supports to shelf and surround to fire opening.  The bookshelf is in cedarwood and the radiator is white.  The settee has mahogany and bamboo end rails, bottle-green wool seat with white buttons, and light grey-green cushions for back.  Loose cushions in red, white, yellow, green.  Danish chairs in beechwood.
Noel Carrington. Colour and Pattern in the Home. 1954.
Read something of paint colours in the 1950s here.

LIVING-ROOM IN A GEORGIAN HOUSE IN NORFOLK

Ceiling, walls and paintwork are white.  The wall over the fireplace covered with Japanese grass-paper.  White tiled surround fireplace with grey and white tiled hearth.  Black slate mantel shelf, polished copper supports to shelf and surround to fire opening.  The bookshelf is in cedarwood and the radiator is white.  The settee has mahogany and bamboo end rails, bottle-green wool seat with white buttons, and light grey-green cushions for back.  Loose cushions in red, white, yellow, green.  Danish chairs in beechwood.

Noel Carrington. Colour and Pattern in the Home. 1954.

Read something of paint colours in the 1950s here.

“Why should I not as well, now, tell you all
The portraiture that was upon the wall
Within the fane of mighty Mars the red?
In length and breadth the whole wall was painted
Like the interior of that grisly place,
The mighty temple of great Mars in Thrace,
In that same cold and frosty region where
Mars to his supreme mansion may repair.
First, on the wall was limned a vast forest
Wherein there dwelt no man nor any beast,
With knotted, gnarled, and leafless trees, so old
The sharpened stumps were dreadful to behold;
Through which there ran a rumbling, even now,
As if a storm were breaking every bough;
And down a hill, beneath a sharp descent,”
Geoffrey Chaucer.  The Knight’s Tale.
BEDROOM IN A HOUSE IN NORFOLK
The ceiling and paintwork are white, the wallpaper off-white, rough textured with wood chippings.  A feature of this room is the brightly coloured cupboards on a low level, made of Perana pine, doors of green and yellow glass and of Swedish pine.  The curtains are white chintz with red pattern.  Floor covered with grey fitted carpet.  The rug is black-and-white Friesian calf skin.
Noel Carrington. Colour and Pattern in the Home. 1954.

BEDROOM IN A HOUSE IN NORFOLK

The ceiling and paintwork are white, the wallpaper off-white, rough textured with wood chippings. A feature of this room is the brightly coloured cupboards on a low level, made of Perana pine, doors of green and yellow glass and of Swedish pine. The curtains are white chintz with red pattern. Floor covered with grey fitted carpet. The rug is black-and-white Friesian calf skin.

Noel Carrington. Colour and Pattern in the Home. 1954.

“In the seventeenth century Newton related colours to the notes of the diatonic scale; red for C, orange for D, yellow for E, green for F, blue for G, indigo for A, violet for B.”
Faber Birren
“[Charles] Fere discovered that red increased muscular tonus (in the human body) from a normal 23 units to 42 - orange increased the units to 35, yellow to 30, green to 28 and blue to 24 - all above normal.”
Faber Birren
“It seems that in every country the words for the colours at the red end of the spectrum are of earlier appearance, more definite, and more numerous than for those at the violet end. On the Niger it appears that there are only three colours, red, white and black, and everything that is not white or black is called red.”
Havelock Ellis
“It is prohibited to send by post: a packet or envelope of a red colour…or of any colour likely to cause strain on the eyes of the officers of the Post Office.”
Post Office regulations
“A man who calls a red light green is obviously unfit to be an engine driver.”
The Encyclopaedia Britannica
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