Officer’s full dress jacket, 16th (or Queen’s) Light Dragoons, 1814. This belonged to William Polhill (?-1867) my 3rd great granduncle who fought at the Battle of Waterloo as a Cornet in the 16th Light Dragoons (later Lancers) in 1815. His invitation to the Waterloo Ball also survives. He transferred to the 1st Life Guards on 26th October 1816 and went onto half pay with the 23rd Light Dragoons in 23rd January 1819.

This pattern uniform was officially abolished in 1812, but many light dragoon regiments were not immediately re-equipped although the 16th Light Dragoons had their wide lapelled plastron-fronted coatee by February 1815, their pouches and belts had not been received. (NAM. 1963-09-215-1)

A pair of flintlock duelling pistols by Wogden,1780 (c). (NAM. 1987-09-6-2)

The case contains two pistols, a powder flask, two flints, a cleaning fluid tin, reamer and bullet mould. It belonged to Captain John Polhill of the 15th (or the King’s) Regiment of Light Dragoons.

Captain John Polhill (1757-1828) was my 4th great granduncle and of Howbury Hall, Bedfordshire. High Sheriff of Bedfordshire in 1805 and Deputy Lieutenant in 1807. As a Captain he distinguished himself in the Birmingham riots of 1791, when the mob took umbrage at the Unitarian Divine and Scientist, Dr. Joseph Priestley, for his support of the French Revolution. The mob burned down the Old and New Meeting Houses and many residences including that of Priestley with all his books, papers and scientific apparatus. Wylie’s History of the regiment says that Captain Polhill’s conduct in connection with the riot was highly commended. After four days’ turmoil the Dragoons were brought from Nottingham and their timely arrival saved the city from destruction. Capt. Polhill was presented with a ceremonial sword and testimonial and a very handsome gold and jewelled medallion.

greeneyes55:

BMW Isetta 1950s
Photo: Anonymous/BMW

greeneyes55:

BMW Isetta 1950s

Photo: Anonymous/BMW

Here’s a great example of the cobalt blue glass pigment Smalt on some 18th century ironwork. See how the smaller pieces have faded to grey. A Prussian blue scheme follows on. See this paper on ironwork.

Here’s a great example of the cobalt blue glass pigment Smalt on some 18th century ironwork. See how the smaller pieces have faded to grey. A Prussian blue scheme follows on. See this paper on ironwork.

Lieutenant Polhill of the 95th

'Our Heroes of the Crimea'. 1855 (pp.116-117)

image

Robert Graham Polhill, who was born in the year 1827, was the second son of Edward Polhill Esq., of Brunswick Square, Brighton, by Anne, daughter of the late Thomas Graham Esq. of Edmond Castle, Cumberland.  The Polhill family is one of great antiquity.  In Kent, the Polhills have been settled since the reign of Edward III.  Two branches of the family made settlements in other counties;’ one in Sussex and another in Bedfordshire.  The Sussex branch, at Burwash, produced the celebrated theological writer, Edward Polhill, whose works were much read in the reign of the second Charles, while that in Bedfordshire is represented by Captain Polhill, of Howbury Park, whose father sat many years in Parliament for Bedford.

The subject of this memoir was gazetted an ensign in the 95th (Derbyshire) when in his eighteenth year, and became lieutenant on the 13th of April, 1852.  From the day of his entering the corps, Polhill became a favourite with officers and men.  His temperament was such as to secure him the affection and respect of all.  Attentive to duty, and considerate of the men under his command, his name was of good repute not only in the mess-room, but in the canteen, where officers’ characters are discussed in whispers.

Lieutenant Polhill belonged to a gallant regiment.  At the battle of the Alma, it earned emblazonments for its colours.  When the light division rushed at the enemy, the Second division moved rapidly to its assistance.  The 95th was in the latter division, it rushed up towards the enemy’s redoubts, cheering as it advanced.  It had eighteen officers disabled long before any material impression was made on the murderous batteries in its front.  On went officers and men, however, with their standards s surrounded by a devoted band.  The redoubts were passed, and the enemy who were flying before the gallant 95th made brief halts, and wheeling round, delivered deadly showers of ball on their pursuers.  The colours were still in front, though tattered from shot.  On went the 95th, its colours in their ragged glory defended by Lieutenant Polhill and Captain Eddington.  The enemy at all points were now flying from the field in broken columns, but so also were their balls on the British hunters.  The 95th delivering a singeing fire on the enemy at bay in their immediate front, charged home, and their loud cheer rang out as they witnessed its effect.  Their standards were high in the air, but most of their heroic preservers were laid low.  A few yards in advance of the colours of the 95th was found the body of Lieutenant Robert Graham Polhill, his sword firmly fixed in the death-grasp.  He had been struck by a musket ball in the head.  In the moment of victory, an honour to his regiment, and amidst the glorious din of exultation, in the heroism that had achieved so great a triumph, he fell, as a brave soldier could wish to fall, between the foe and his sovereign’s flag.

The Ivy House pub in south London has been saved. A key venue in the pub-rock movement that paved the way for punk in the 1970s. Elvis Costello, Ian Dury and Dr Feelgood all played here.  I have recently completed an analysis of its decoration since it was built in the 1930s - http://patrickbaty.co.uk/2013/08/15/the-ivy-house/

greeneyes55:

England 1960s 
Photo: Anonymous

greeneyes55:

England 1960s

Photo: Anonymous

The entrance hall is beginning to make sense

The entrance hall is beginning to make sense

Victoria Room, Stowe. Distracted while sampling the paint on the ceiling.

Victoria Room, Stowe. Distracted while sampling the paint on the ceiling.

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